Tag: Themes

F. Scott Fitzgerald – Bernice Bobs Her Hair | Review

Title: Bernice Bobs Her Hair

Author: F. Scott Fitzgerald

Type: Fiction

Page Count: 176

Rating: 3.75/5

This little collection brings together a bunch of different F. Scott Fitzgerald stories together, including of course the titular story here. It’s fun and Fitzgerald has a stunning writing style that makes it easy to fall in love with his work.

This goes hand in hand with another one of Fitzgerald’s books that I can’t remember now, although I actually think that the other one was the better of the two. Either way, when you couple them together, they pretty much collect together all of Fitzgerald’s short stories.

It’s fun because I got into Fitzgerald through The Great Gatsby, but I kind of feel as though his short stories are better. They certainly allow him to explore more themes, and that can only be a good thing. There’s just something about his work that feels comforting to me, even though it is a little dated from time to time. He’s definitely worth reading.

Learn more about Bernice Bobs Her Hair.

 


Edward Lorn – Life After Dane | Review

Title: Life After Dane

Author: Edward Lorn

Type: Fiction

Page Count: 268

Rating: 4.5/5

I’m probably quite biased here because this book was written by a BookTube friend and because my name’s in the title, so I guess it would almost be weird if I didn’t like it. I was also given a copy as a gift from someone who’d seen my wish list. But it also has a lot of the themes that I like, and the story line itself is cracking, a sort of paranormal thriller following the weird stuff that our narrator starts to experience after her son, the Truck Stop Dentist serial killer Dane Peters, is put to death by lethal injection.

This was very, very good for an indie book, although I don’t like the cover much. But covers don’t matter, and I was impressed by everything from the quality of the writing to the interior layout. I was also a big fan of the way that Lorn told the story using Dane’s mother as a mouthpiece. She’s perhaps the only person in the world who knows why he turned out like he did.

And then there are the religious themes, as well as the recurring motif of the hymn Amazing Grace. It’s funny because while I’m not religious myself, I’ve always found it interesting to read about religion in fiction. I’ve even dabbled with writing about it myself. The bottom line is that I’d recommend this if you’re interested in thrillers in general, but especially if you’re keen to support indie authors in a difficult marketplace.

Learn more about Life After Dane.