Tag: Naturalist

Edith Holden – The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady | Review

Title: The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady

Author: Edith Holden

Type: Non-Fiction

Page Count/Review Word Count: 187

Rating: 4*/5

 

Edith Holden - The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady

Edith Holden – The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady

 

I picked up this book after hearing a YouTuber I watch (Hannah Tay) talking about it on her channel, and I’m glad that I did. It’s basically exactly what it claims to be, a facsimile reproduction of naturalist Edith Holden’s 1906 diary, complete with her hand-drawn colour illustrations.

It makes for a fascinating read, and part of the reason for that is actually because she didn’t write that many entries. That’s a good thing, because it enables you to whizz from month to month and season to season without a problem. You can literally watch the year fly by and read it in a single sitting, and it’s a joy to behold because of that. Then there’s the fact that it’s all handwritten, which occasionally makes it hard to read but which also lends it authenticity.

All in all, this book is an artifact. It’s beautiful in its own right and makes for a great addition to your collection.

 

Edith Holden

Edith Holden

 

Click here to buy The Country Diary of an Edwardian Lady.

 


David Attenborough – Life On Earth | Review

Title: Life On Earth

Author: David Attenborough

Type: Non-Fiction

Page Count/Review Word Count: 324

Rating: 4*/5

 

David Attenborough - Life On Earth

David Attenborough – Life On Earth

 

If you’re familiar with the work of David Attenborough then you know roughly what to expect here. This is basically the great naturalist’s narrative on how life on earth came about, and it’s thoroughly fascinating if you’re interested in animals – although also occasionally intimidating as well.

My copy of it is maybe forty years old, but it’s still pretty interesting and it’s all up-to-date in most areas – except for where Attenborough said there were four billion humans on the planet. It also comes with plenty of high quality imagery because he wrote the book at the same time as filming the documentary series of the same name, so he’s able to tap into the footage from the show and from other wildlife photographers. Sometimes they take up both pages of a two-page spread, which means they’re shown in fantastic quality – and that it’s easier to whizz through pages than you might first imagine.

I think the most interesting aspect of this book is actually the little things that you learn about different animals, although I find it hard to think of a specific example. But it’s cool when he tells you about the animal with the largest eyes in relation to the rest of its body (I think it was a lemur at 250 times larger in proportion than human eyes) and then you turn the page and see a photo of it.

All in all then, this book definitely isn’t for everyone – and in fact, I suspect it’s meant as more of a coffee table book than as one that you’d pick up and read from cover to cover. Nevertheless, that’s what I did and I enjoyed it, and so if you’re an animal lover or you think that biology is just fascinating, you’re going to like it. If not, you still might.

 

David Attenborough

David Attenborough

 

Click here to buy Life On Earth.

 


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