Tag: Ariadne Oliver

Agatha Christie – Third Girl | Review

Title: Third Girl

Author: Agatha Christie

Type: Fiction

Page Count: 224

Rating: 3.75/5

This book was fun, the first Christie novel that I’ve picked up for a little while now and really just the ticket considering Ariadne Oliver is one of my favourite of Christie’s characters. It also has the kind of setup that I like, where the main witness to the crime doesn’t really know what it was that she saw.

The only thing that I would say is that this one is just pretty competent. There’s a reason why I’ve never really seen anyone talk about it, why I hadn’t come across it in a charity shop and why it took me so long to finally end up with a copy.

So would I recommend it? Yeah, probably. It’s a good little addition to the Poirot series and features the old detective as an older man, to the point at which the story almost doesn’t happen because someone thinks he’s too old to be able to help them out.

The only real problem is that it doesn’t excel in any way. In fact, if it wasn’t for the fact that Ariadne Oliver is in it, it would mostly be forgettable, but Mrs Oliver is so cool that I’m always happy whenever she shows up in a story.

Learn more about Third Girl.

 


Agatha Christie – The Pale Horse | Review

Title: The Pale Horse

Author: Agatha Christie

Type: Fiction

Page Count: 266

Rating: 3.5/5

This is nowhere near the best of Agatha Christie’s books, but even here when she’s average I guess at best, she’s still better than most other writers. Plus I could be a little biased there because neither Hercule Poirot or Miss Marple appears here, although Ariadne Oliver does and she might well be my favourite of all of Christie’s supporting cast of characters.

I also quite liked the idea of the pale horse and the way that was used as a recurring theme throughout. Christie is great at doing that and we’ve seen her do it throughout her career with the various different books that play with nursery rhymes. This book is like a twist on that I guess, and with the added bonus that Ariadne Oliver is basically just a mouthpiece for Christie to share some of her own thoughts on life as a writer.

What’s kind of funny is that in many ways, she’s more open and honest about her relationship with writing here than she was in her autobiography. She always seemed to think of herself as more of a housewife than as an author, despite the fact that she’s one of the bestselling authors of all time.

So when it comes down to the question of whether or not I’d recommend this one, it really depends. If you’re new to Christie then it probably makes sense to start with one of her more well-known books instead of going for this one. Yeah.

Learn more about The Pale Horse.