Tag: Action

Tom Nichols – The Death of Expertise | Review

Title: The Death of Expertise

Author: Tom Nichols

Type: Non-Fiction

Page Count: 254

Rating: 4.5/5

This is easily one of the best non-fiction books that I’ve picked up this year and so I was a very happy bunny. It’s also pretty cool because it was recommended to me by one of my clients, to the point at which he paid for me to purchase a copy of it.

It’s basically all about the way in which everyone thinks they’re an expert today. We overrule doctors because we can Google our symptoms, but we also overrule experts in their different fields instead of taking their hard earned advice.

This is a huge problem, of course, but it’s even more of a problem in the midst of a global pandemic when people are convincing themselves that there’s some sort of secret conspiracy to deprive us all of our liberty by getting us to wear masks in shops. In fact, I’d go so far as to say that I found this book more enjoyable than I normally would have because of the time in which I read it.

Arguably my favourite example in the whole book was that of American attitudes towards military action in Ukraine. It turns out that the less people knew about the Ukraine, the more likely they were to demand military action. Those who thought it was in Australia or South America were those who were most likely to support military involvement. What a world, man.

Learn more about The Death of Expertise.

 


William Shakespeare – Much Ado About Nothing | Review

Title: Much Ado About Nothing

Author: William Shakespeare

Type: Fiction

Page Count: 268

Rating: 4/5

I’m not sure how I hadn’t got to this play yet, but I’m glad I picked it up. I think it’s actually one of the easiest of Shakespeare’s plays to follow, and I flew through it because I have a weird edition. The left pages have the notes on and the right side has the play, but I didn’t need the notes except for the introductions to each scene to make sure that I knew what was going on.

One of the things that interested me here is that it focusses on a case of mistaken identity, which Shakespeare has done elsewhere. He does it well, and this play is a fantastic example of that. At the same time, it was much easier to understand and to follow the action than it was in The Comedy of Errors, which has some similarities.

But this also stands up on its own as a fantastic little play and something that’s going to stick with me for a while. There’s also a little bit of romance in there, presumably to give it some more mainstream appeal, and the humour is of the kind where I think anyone could enjoy it. That makes it a play for all the family, and I hope that at some point I get to see a performance of it.

We’ll see, though. That might have to wait until after all of the coronavirus stuff has blown over. But Shakespeare was quarantined too, I hear.

Learn more about Much Ado About Nothing.